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peach
I get enamoured

Just call me "Mom"

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(Originally posted on: 01-18-03 01:56:27 PM)
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I have updated this topic post to include names of already mentioned books and links to the posts (hopefully)
This should help with people who want to know what has been mentioned but who don't want to wade through all of the posts.

20000 leagues under the sea (Jules Verne) Book info Loudspoken's post
48 Laws of Power (Robert Greene) Book info PimpForALiving's post

A Ranger Born (Robert W. Black) Book info freekboy13's post
A Storm of Swords (George R. R. Martin) Book info the winged cock's post
American Psycho (Bret Easton Ellis) Book Info I Like Being Killed's post
As I Lay Dying (William Faulkner) Book info emtilt's post
As You Like It (William Shakespeare)Book info emtilt's post
Barabbas (Par Lagerkvist) Book info Guru's post
Brave New World (Aldous Huxley) Book info holdensantidepressant
Beloved (Toni Morrison) Book info Guru's post

C++ Primer Plus 4th Edition (Stephen Prata)Book info Brad4321's post
Candide (Voltaire) Book info Guru's post
Choke (Chuck Palahniuk) Book info Sandamnit's post

Chronicle of a Death Foretold (Gabriel Garcia Marquez) Book info Magus's post
Cryptonomicon (Neal Stephenson) Book info Guru's post
Death of a Salesman (Arthur Miller) Book info Guru's post

Ender's Game (Orson Scott Card) Book Info Marcher's post
Eugene Onegin (Alexander Puskin) Book info Nailbunny's post
Fever Pitch (Nick Hornby) Book info asthetik's post
Firestarter (Stephen King) Book info Scott's post
Flatland (Edwin A. Abbott) Book info Dimi's post
Foundation (Isaac Asimov) Book info Phoenix's post
Frankenstein (Mary Shelley) Book info Ztolk's post
Girl, Interrupted (Susanna Kaysen) Book info Jennifer's post
House of Leaves (Mark Z. Danielewski) Book info Guru's post

In A Dry Season (Peter Robinson) Book info I Like Being Killed's post
Invitation to a Beheading (Vladimir Nabokov) Book info Guru's post

La Fiesta del Chivo (Mario Vargas Llosa) Book info Trofozoito's post
Lamb (Christopher Moore) Book info Guru's post
LotR: Fellowship of the Ring (Tolkien) Book info Marcher's post
Lovely Bones (Alice ) Book info dramamine's post
Lullaby (Chuck Palinhiuk) Book info bicentennialman's post Mr Pixies's post

Notes from the Underground (Fyodor Dostoyevsky) Book info Guru's post
Of Mice and Men (John Steinbeck) Book Info Dimi's post Magus's post
Raise High the Roof Beam Carpenters (J.D. Salinger) Book info Frankovich's post

Shadow of the Hegemon (Orson Scott Card) Book info Ice's post
Shadow Puppets (Orson Scott Card) Book info Emtilt's post
Sigma Protocol (Robert Ludlum) Book info Spazz's post
Speaker for the Dead (Orson Scott Card) Book Info Marcher's post

The Archer's Tale (Bernard Cornwell) Book info Mojo's post
The Blind Watchmaker (Richard Dawkins) Book info Spit Fire's post
The Bluest Eye (Toni Morrison) Book info Frank's Koolaid's post


The Brothers Karamazov (Fyodor Dostoyevsky) Book info Guru's post
The Crying Lot of 49 (Thomas Pynchon) Book info Mr Excitable's post
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time (Mark Haddon) Book info johnny's post
The Dark Elf Trilogy (R.A.Salvatore) Book info Barfing Fetus's post
The First Man in Rome (Colleen McCullough) Book info redheadediswear's post
The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald) Book info Magus's post
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Douglas Adams) Book info peach's post

The Hot Zone (Richard Preston) Book info boutitben's post
The House of the Scorpion (Nancy Farmer) Book info Marcher's post
The Long Hard Road Out of Hell (Marilyn Manson) Book info Scott's post
The Lorax (Dr. Seuss)Book info nimo's post
The Moon is a Harsh Mistress (Robert Heinlein) Book info Guru's post
The Nanny Diaries (Emma McLaughlin & Nicola Kraus) Book info minimalista's post

The Outsider (Albert Camus) -mentioned in this post Book info
The Rapture of Canaan (Sheri Reynolds) Book info squee's post

The Sunflower (Simon Wiesenthal) Book info Mr Excitable's post
To Hell and Back (Audie Murphy) Book info freekboy13's post

Trainspotting (Irvine Welsh) Book info uselessinformation's post
True Story (Bill Maher) Book info peach's post
Tuesdays with Morrie (Mitch Albom)Book Info Lovely Insanity's post
Sewer, Gas and Electric (Matt Ruff) Book info Guru's post

We The Living (Ayn Rand) Book info bicentennialman's post
White Noise (Don DeLillo) Book info Guru's post
Wuthering Heights (Emily Bronte) Book info Guru's post


To start, I read "The Outsider" by Albert Camus last week, it's not even really a book, but more a novella. If I were to rate it, I'd probably give it a 10/10 if for just the subject matter and because I read it awhile ago and it really expanded my views. It's a very existentiallist novella and when you read it, it's hard to not fall into the mindset of the narrator.

Originally written in French as "L'Etranger" the novella was one of Camus' earlier works, he's also known for "The Plague" and I'm really not sure what else. He is originally from Algeria. The book explores a selection of a mans life, this man is Mersault. It starts out with him going to his mothers funeral, and he's just so apathetic to the whole situation. His most valid comment concerning his mothers passing is "It was inconvienient for me, the timing was bad" and that he "would've prefered that it hadn't happened" but nothing with more depth. The character is described by Camus as being fundamentally honest. Basically he goes on the theory that everyone in everyday life uses erroneous emotions and erroneous actions to describe thier most simple feelings. Later on in the book some events transpire (I don't want to ruin the book) and he's taken to trial, and one of the main arguements of the prosecutor is that he didn't cry at his own mothers funeral, and he had a coffee and a cigarette with the coroner. But you find yourself wondering how this happened, because when you read it from his mindset, it doesn't seem like this horrible horrible thing; you more see it as this unfortunate man in bad circumstances, when all he really does is tell the truth, the painful truth that is hard for everyone else to hear because it's such a strange idea that what we feel is like an exagerration of the truth.

Anyway, I could really write essays on this book, but I really enjoyed it. I'm sure some of the literal description is lost in the translation, but it's still beautifully described and it puts you in a really beautiful mindset. Whether or not you find yourself feeling sorry for the narrator, or frightfully disgusted by his lack of emotions, I still think that it will make you think long and hard about what emotions we really feel, and what we are perhaps supposed to feel. It is really short, so I'd suggest that anyone who is remotely interested go and pick it up or rent it or whatever.
It's been a long december.
You get the feeling it's all a lot of oysters
with no pearls

This reply was last edited on 11-24-05 01:45:15 PM by peach.
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Reply 1 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-18-03 06:46:27 PM)
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I've been reading Ayn Rand's Atlas shrugged, but the thing doesn't seem to end, so i'll give you a review on Flatland.
Flatland is a short book less than 90 pages. However, atleast not for me, you can't really zip through it. It tells you about a creature living in Flatland (a 2 dimensional world). He talks about life in Flatland, how things work, and he explains all that. Then he descibes his visits to pointland(no dimensions) and lineland (one dimension), and how he is taken to Spaceland(3d) and beyond. Its a real eye opener. Take the chance to read it if you can.

"MY BUM IS ON THE MAN!" - Flaming Arrow
"I just think circumsized dicks look a whole lot better" - Flaming Arrow
Well Danielle, when you turned your back on our religion and basically questioned all of our values and practically insulted our whole sense of faith and our lifestyle, we were alright with that, we let that slide. THEN you came and said that you're attracted to women, we thought that was questionable, but we could get used to it. But the day that you have pornographic videos on your computer, YOU'RE FUCKING OUT. - Danielle's parents

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Reply 2 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-18-03 07:33:42 PM)
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Shadow of the Hegemon - Orson Scott Card

Set in the world of Ender's Game, this book focuses on the politics of the world Ender left. The Battle school graduates (particularly those from Ender's Army) are greatly valued as a strategic resource of the nation they in which they were born. The book starts out with all of Ender's army (except for Bean) being kidnapped by an unknown nation, and it quickly escalates into a Indian-Pakistani Allaince and beyond.

It was really awesome, and I reccomend it to anyone who enjoyed Ender's Game.
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Reply 3 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-19-03 11:02:01 AM)
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Shadow Puppets - Orson Scott Card

This is the third book in the series of parallel novels to the Ender's Game series. This series follows Bean's life. This book comes after the book reviewed by ice.

It shows you Peter Wiggin's rise to power, and focuses on Bean's personal life moreso than the previous books. Bean must deal with his 'rival' while also helping to keep the balance of power stable in the world.

This whole series, as well as the Ender's Game series, is wonderful, and I highly reccomend it to anyone.
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Reply 4 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-19-03 02:27:51 PM)
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How many books are there in the Enders Game series? I'd like to read them all since Enders Game is pretty much my favorite book.


Anyway: LotR: Fellowship of the Ring - Tolkien

This book flat out sucks. I'm sorry, but it's true. The story is pretty cool, but his writing style puts me to sleep. I'm not even going to finish TTT, since its hardly better.

Bottom line: It's quite possibly the most boring book I've ever read in my life. I don't recommend it.
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Reply 5 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-19-03 05:14:25 PM)
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I write semi-periodic book reviews for a friend's website. They're too big to put in one post, but if there's any interest level, I could put one of them up here in two consecutive posts. I don't want to take up a lot of space and tick everyone off if no one's interested. So far, I've done Everything is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer and The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde. Let me know if any of you would be interested in reading one or more of them.
Do not frighten me more than you have to! I must live forever.

~ Frank O'Hara
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Reply 6 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-19-03 07:39:26 PM)
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I recently read Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. It's a good book. The language sounds very old, and you can really see how much the English language has changed over the last 200 years. I'm not sure what she was trying to go for in the book, but I see it as the story of a superior being who was demonized by society solely becuase of the fact that he looked different than most people.
My girlfriend rocks. She has shortcuts to my favourite sites, cookies that let me post without retyping my password, and she runs all my favourite games.
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Reply 7 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-21-03 03:13:37 PM)
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I recently read Tuesdays with Morrie. It's mostly a philosophy book, about views on death and such. It taught me alot, and brought ideas and theories that I knew of, but hadn't thought of extensively. I give it an 8/10.
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Reply 8 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-21-03 04:14:48 PM)
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"The Lorax" is an amazing book chronicling the glory days of a forest full of brilliantly colored Trufulla trees, the arrival of a Once-Ler, his discovery that Trufulla trees make very soft Thneeds, and the forest's demise as a consequence of the ever increasing demand for these Thneeds. It's a book everyone can relate to.

Characters



The Lorax

The Lorax is the one who speaks for the trees. He is shortish and oldish and brownish and mossy, and speaks with a voice that is sharpish and bossy. The Lorax shows up once the Once-Ler starts chopping down trees. He's wicked pissed because this fellow, this Once-Ler, is destroying the majestic Truffula forest. He's quick too, as soon as the first Truffula was destroyed he pops out of the stump, guns blazing, demanding answers, fast. The Once-Ler is all "chill, it's only one tree, I'm making a Thneed with it, it's cool bro. Seriously." Quoth The Lorax: "Fuck that shit." The Lorax tries to fight the Once-Ler but isn't able to defeat him, and ultimately runs away from the empty forest with the Brown Bar-ba-loots, Swomee-Swans and Humming Fish. It's the saddest thing ever. mm i wanna suck ur cock lol(

Once-Ler

The Once-Ler is the creature who decided that money was more important than saving the Truffula Tree forest. He is green, hairy, and self-centered. He's a bit like dimi actually. The Once-Ler finds out that Truffula trees can be used to make Thneeds that are softer than silk and he immediately realizes that he's got something hot on his hands, "What to do with this, I racked my brain. I knew what I had would be the next cocaine!" The Once-Ler chops down all the Truffula trees in the forest, and pollutes the air and water to so badly that all the animals have to leave. He then boards himself up in a house, and masturbates furiously forever and ever.

Truffula Trees



Truffula Trees are trees with a tuft of something at the top that is softer than silk, with a terrific smell, of fresh buttermilk. The forest of Truffula trees that feeds the Brown Bar-ba-loots, and provides shelter for the Swomee-Swans. Well there was a forest until Captain "Capitalist Whore" decided to cut it down. All the Truffula trees are gone until, at the end of the book, the Once-Ler gives the last seed to a little boy to start a new Truffula forest. In the unpubished sequel to "The Lorax" the boy sells the seed and developes a drug problem that ultimately takes his life.

Brown Bar-ba-loots, Swomee-Swans and Humming-Fish



Yeah, Bar-ba-loots, Swomee Swans, Humming-Fish... yeah, all dead. Thanks a lot, asshat.

Overall



Overall "The Lorax" is a damn fine read. It has the emotional twists and turns that I love in a book, as well as pretty illustrations that distract me for hours on end. The characters rock, the villain is dastardly, the colors are colorful, and this Doctor busts out more rhymes than the entire Wu-Tang clan in some sort of magical rhyme machine. "The Lorax" gets 4 out of 5 pictures of this guy's head.


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Reply 9 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-21-03 08:00:10 PM)
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nimo: The Lorax owns all

The last book I read was Sewer, Gas, and Electric: The Public Works Trilogy by Matt Ruff. The story takes place in the year 2023. All black people save a handful were killed in a few by an worldwide plague that erupted everywhere at once in the year 2004. Robotic servants (nicknamed "Electric Negroes" since almost all have a black skin color) are commonly used in everyday profession. The basic plot is that a rival of the Harry Gant, (the owner of the company which makes Electric Negroes) has been assinated, and the evidence seems to suggest that an Electric Negro did it, despite the numerous mechanical and electricakl fail safe devices that are supposed to keep something like that from happening. Joan Fine, Harry's ex-wife, investigates the murder with a motley assortment of other characters.


I thought that the book was rather good. Ruff brings up several issues throughout the novel and makes a few interesting points and the subject of equality, civil liberties, and such.
"The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently."
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Reply 10 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-22-03 11:19:53 PM)
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I'm going to run over the lorax in my gas-guzzling hummer one day.

"MY BUM IS ON THE MAN!" - Flaming Arrow
"I just think circumsized dicks look a whole lot better" - Flaming Arrow
Well Danielle, when you turned your back on our religion and basically questioned all of our values and practically insulted our whole sense of faith and our lifestyle, we were alright with that, we let that slide. THEN you came and said that you're attracted to women, we thought that was questionable, but we could get used to it. But the day that you have pornographic videos on your computer, YOU'RE FUCKING OUT. - Danielle's parents

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Reply 11 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-24-03 01:21:36 PM)
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I recently read Thomas Pynchons the crying of lot 49. The book is based in 1960s California and focus on the issues of music, science and drugs. The main Character is left as the executor of an estate and soon discovers that this estate is connected to an orginaization that appears to control the united states and maybe the world. Its a good ready only 184 pages give it a shot
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making jabs at each other is what the internet is for you fucking idiots. oh, and for stealing things.

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Reply 12 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-24-03 11:11:43 PM)
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The last book I read was Fever Pitch by Nick Hornby.

It is an autobiographical memoir about his life and Arsenal, the English football club, and how the two are inextricably intertwined. Very interesting and unconventional read. Instead of being grouped into chapters, each section is a recount of a football match. Great read for fans of the beautiful game and even for those who are not.
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Reply 13 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-25-03 12:57:16 AM)
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Quote:
I recently read Thomas Pynchons the crying of lot 49. The book is based in 1960s California and focus on the issues of music, science and drugs. The main Character is left as the executor of an estate and soon discovers that this estate is connected to an orginaization that appears to control the united states and maybe the world. Its a good ready only 184 pages give it a shot


I tried to read Gravity's Rainbow a while ago, and while it seemed rather good, almost all of it was going right over my head, so I gave up. I've been wanting to read The Crying of Lot 49 for a while, but I was hesitant to try any more Pynchon for a while. Would you happen to know how this book compares with GR?
"The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently."
- Friedrich Nietzsche
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Reply 14 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-28-03 06:49:44 PM)
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I havent read GR yet but the crying of lot 49 for the most part wa really easy to follow except one spot about the plays, you will understand if you read it. Id suggest you give it a try again
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Reply 15 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-28-03 09:21:12 PM)
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Just finished The House of the Scorpion.

The title might lead you to believe this is some sort of "scary" book, but it isn't. It's the story of a young clone. He's the clone of a old, old, old drug lord. He grows up in a mansion, and almost everybody hates him (because he's a clone), then he finds out the truth about why he was created and stuff.
It's set in the future about a hundred years, although the story definitely does not have a futuristic feel to it.

I liked it. It's not a spectacular book or anything, but it's interesting and a good book that you don't have to think too hard about. I'd recommend it.
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Reply 16 of 184 (Originally posted on: 01-30-03 03:27:43 AM)
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A Storm of Swords by George R.R Martin.

Greatest fantasy I have read in a long, long time. Bloody author kills off the main characters left right and centre but its still good shit. Good characters (until they fucking die) and an excellent, huge plot with massive scope. This is the third book which was split in two of a series called A Song of Ice and Fire. The entire series is amazing, and filled with characters dying. Hooray!
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Reply 17 of 184 (Originally posted on: 02-01-03 06:32:37 PM)
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Ender's Game - Orson Scott Card

Ender's Game is one of my favorite books. The basic plot is a genius kid who has to save the world from aliens. But it's really awesome.

If you haven't read it, I suggest you do soon.
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Reply 18 of 184 (Originally posted on: 02-10-03 07:35:26 PM)
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Of Mice and Men - story about 2 guys in the Great Depression (migrant workers). One has the mind of a child, but is incredibly nice. He is huge, muscular. He would never do anything out of meaness, but he has done bad things because he has the mind of a child. Great book, and what an ending. Only 90 or so pages, I suggest you read.

"MY BUM IS ON THE MAN!" - Flaming Arrow
"I just think circumsized dicks look a whole lot better" - Flaming Arrow
Well Danielle, when you turned your back on our religion and basically questioned all of our values and practically insulted our whole sense of faith and our lifestyle, we were alright with that, we let that slide. THEN you came and said that you're attracted to women, we thought that was questionable, but we could get used to it. But the day that you have pornographic videos on your computer, YOU'RE FUCKING OUT. - Danielle's parents

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Reply 19 of 184 (Originally posted on: 02-15-03 12:24:25 AM)
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Quoted from Dimi:
Of Mice and Men - story about 2 guys in the Great Depression (migrant workers). One has the mind of a child, but is incredibly nice. He is huge, muscular. He would never do anything out of meaness, but he has done bad things because he has the mind of a child. Great book, and what an ending. Only 90 or so pages, I suggest you read.


This was my favorite book I read in the first quarter of my freshman year. It is quite good, for it has subtle meaning.

I'm currently reading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. I'll post a review when I am done with it. So far, it's a really interesting and good book that has a lot of philosophy in it.
Well, well, well... Magus finally has free time to post!
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Reply 20 of 184 (Originally posted on: 02-15-03 07:04:21 PM)
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Speaker for the Dead (Orson Scott Card)

First sequel to Ender's Game. 3000 years after Ender's Game, Ender is still alive because he's been doing a lot of space travel. On the planet Lusitania, a new sentient species has been discovered (the piggies), and Ender ends up traveling to the planet to perform duties as a Speaker for the Dead. He also goes to release the Hive Queen to make up for destroying the rest of the buggers 3000 years ago.

Really great book.
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Reply 21 of 184 (Originally posted on: 02-16-03 12:25:15 PM)
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I just finished reading The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky. The first book I read by Dostoevsky was Crime and Punishment, and and I thought TBK was every bit as good, if not better than C&P. Politcally, philosophically, and socially, Dostoevsky says a lot more in the TBK than in C&P. Much of it is revolves around the existence or nonexistence of God, and how each of the two affect people. He also says a lot in regards to the the growing nihilistic movement that was growing in Russia at that time, much of it very critical. Plot wise, TBK is excellent, however, if you're not interested in his social statements, and are looking for something like Tom Clancy, you probably won't like it it will seem very slow to you, as the actual story unfolds very slowly over the 900 pages. A great book.
"The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently."
- Friedrich Nietzsche

This reply was last edited on 02-16-03 02:51:31 PM by Guru.
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Reply 22 of 184 (Originally posted on: 02-16-03 09:33:04 PM)
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The Nanny Diaries - Emma McLaughlin & Nicola Kraus
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I loved it, literally couldn't put it down. Very subtle humor, very real story. Recommend, yes.
I Like Being Killed


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Reply 23 of 184 (Originally posted on: 02-17-03 02:44:09 PM)
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I just finished "In A Dry Season" by Peter Robinson. Since I suck with summing up books and feel like a jackass when I try to, I'll give you a snippet of the book-jacket synopsis: "Water is the essence of life. Yet during a dry season, when supply cannot meet demand, the precious commodity rapidly drains from a manmade reservoir to reveal a forgotten town that was sacrificed for the sake of water.

"A blistering summer has struck, and thirst has consumed the resources provided by the Thornfield Reservoir, unmasking the remains of Hobb's End, a small village at its bottom that ceased to exist in post World War II England. A curious child thinks of the resurfaced hamlet as a mystical playground, until he unearths a human skeleton. Modern forensics determine that the skeleton belongs to a young woman who appears to have been brutally murdered and hidden beneath the floor of a decrepit outbuilding in the 1940s. It falls to a grudge-wielding police superior to select a detective for the impossible task of putting a name to the unidentifiable remains from a place that no longer exists, and whose living former residents are scattered to the winds.

"Having challenged the system and his superiors once too often, Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks has been restricted to desk duty as punishment for insubordination, until an official telephone call lands him in the muck of the decades-old murder. Given the state of affairs, any sensible policeman would throw in the towel, but not Banks. Aided by Annie Cabbot, an intuitve Detective Sergeant, Banks challenges the odds by identifying the victim and proceeds to uncover the past buried beneath a flood of time, indiscretions and denial."

Yep, that's about right. Murder-mystery, basically, but incredibly smart, much more probing than your typical NY Times bestseller detective novel. It was a slow read, I guess, but it wasn't so bad... progress is steady and rising throughout, and there's no bullshit thriller surprises that try to go for your gut. The ending was a bit of a cop-out in its own little way, but then again, it also completely redeemed any slowness that might've discouraged you earlier in the book. I liked it.

Before that, I read "American Psycho" by Bret Easton Ellis. Which was more than I ever could've imagined, but it's differently for a certain crowd... it's probably one of the most violently graphic things I've ever read. It's great, but I have no idea who to recommend it to.
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Reply 24 of 184 (Originally posted on: 02-18-03 02:56:32 AM)
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I read Notes from the Underground yesterday, also by Fyodor Dostoevsky. I'll be honest and say that this book is difficult to understand, especially if you unfamiliar with the period of Russian history in which it was written and some of the prevailing ideas of the time (which for the most part I am). From what I do know though, the book was written as a satirical rebuttal of the philosophy of Chernyshevsky. His philosophy (rational egoism) believes in determinism, and that people could form a perfect society through reason once shown his true interests. The character in NftU has no name, and is commonly reffered to as the Underground Man. He fully accepts determinism, and all of the stipulations that must come with it, including the fact that if there is no free will, no man is responsible for anything. This is used to show the flaws in rational egoism by taking the philosophy to the its fullest degree.

This is a quote from the book that I rather liked:

In the past he [man] looked on bloodshed as an act of justice and exterminated those he thought necessary to exterminate with a clear conscience; but now we consider bloodshed an abomination and we engage in this abomination more than ever. Which is worse? You'd better decide for yourselves.

(As a final note, I spent five hours in the library today researching Dostoevsky for an English project, so you know why I've read so much Dostoevsky lately)
"The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently."
- Friedrich Nietzsche
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